GreenSky London Project Taking Off

Solena Fuels in partnership with British Airways has committed to building the world’s first facility to convert landfill waste into jet fuel. The chosen location for this innovative project is the Thames Enterprise Park, part of the site of the former Coryton oil refinery in Thurrock, Essex. The site has excellent transport links and existing fuel storage facilities. One thousand construction workers will be hired to build the facility which is due to be completed in 2017, creating up to 150 permanent jobs.

This ground-breaking fuel project is set to revolutionise the production of sustainable aviation fuel. Approximately 575,000 tonnes of post-recycled waste normally destined for landfill or incineration will instead be converted into 120,000 tonnes of clean burning liquid fuels using Solena’s innovative integrated technology. British Airways has made a long-term commitment to purchase all 50,000 tonnes per annum of the jet fuel produced at market competitive rates.

WHY IS BRITISH AIRWAYS COMMITTED TO DOING THIS PROJECT?

  • World’s first advanced technology waste biomass to biojet fuel plant
  • Input: residual derived fuel (sorted municipal, commercial waste)
  • Output: sustainable, drop-in jet & diesel
  • Site selected: Old Coryton Refinery East of London
  • Primary driver – reducing emissions
  • Waste biomass to liquid plant – uses waste destined for landfill
  • Abundant source of waste
  • Meet the total fuel needs of London City Airport

A rendering of the project: Consent architecture work has begun, pre-FEED has been completed and the next phase of engineering to begin in 2Q2014:

KEY PROJECT STRENGTHS

  • Ability to use negative cost feedstock and sell fuel at market prices
  • First of its kind
  • Unique combination of high temp plasma gasification and FT tech
  • Top industry technology consortium
  • Meets the EU requirements to Carbon Emission reduction (RSB & RED)
  • Fuel is drop in, certified and requires no change in fuel infrastructure
  • Biorefinery is considered environmentally benign

THE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM